Blob Editor?

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New topic Register Log in. However one thing I may be blindly missing? In our database we have a longblob that is use to store the raw form of large XML documents. In the current version when I select the field I get the binary editor, showing me the hex values. Has this feature been editing the binary data as text sql Once you've done so, HeidiSQL pops up with a text editor for editing.

HEX is displayed in all columns which have a binary collation so it's safe to edit a binary file for example. Sadly editing the binary data as text sql can't control the schema for how we get things. Also theoretically these data structures could contain many megabites of data. I assume, hence the blob. I know, but it's not our schema to control: So we should break everyone's data and display binary stuff as text? Well, just starr rfe - it basically says what you need - add a text view er to the binary editor.

I have a rather agnostic and minimalist approach to database type issues. All of this information could be provided in a myriad of ways to a database with no notion of a column type at all.

Its just a crutch from the history of software development. The fact is, databases dont interoperate with programming languages. No database integrates type wise except through a translation layer to its clients. They may agree on certain basics like whats a number or whats a string, or a date if your lucky, but if you wanna use Java as an example not a single DB vendor fully implements the JDBC specification going back a decade. And thats a sunny, rosy best case example. ODBC and anything else editing the binary data as text sql could speak of are far worse.

Thats why, in my code I always convert every single column value to a string. It always does a proper and btw human readable conversion. If you convert every column into a string in the client your database is actually readable.

Pick up the phone, call the guy that controls it, tell him he's doing it wrong. As editing the binary data as text sql workaround, create a VIEW to cast the data: Not every binary character fits in a Unicode string, and a lot of string handling functions will barf up garbage if you try anyway. That usually means cutting the string short, or removing a couple of characters from it.

If by "string" you mean handle data as 8-bit in some character set, then yeah you'll be fine, as long as you don't use any C functions which will abort on NUL character, giving you garbage truncation again. Also if you mismatch the character set you'll see wrong stuff, so there's a bit of manual work involved, matching everything up.

If by "string" you mean "byte array", then yeah that should work fine. Not a very useful representation, though, being essentially just a bunch of numbers.

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The storage size is n bytes. The data that is entered can be 0 bytes in length. When n is not specified in a data definition or variable declaration statement, the default length is 1.

When n is not specified with the CAST function, the default length is When data is converted from a string data type char , varchar , nchar , nvarchar , binary , varbinary , text , ntext , or image to a binary or varbinary data type of unequal length, SQL Server pads or truncates the data on the right. When other data types are converted to binary or varbinary , the data is padded or truncated on the left.

Padding is achieved by using hexadecimal zeros. Converting data to the binary and varbinary data types is useful if binary data is the easiest way to move around data. Converting any value of any type to a binary value of large enough size and then back to the type, always results in the same value if both conversions are taking place on the same version of SQL Server.

The binary representation of a value might change from version to version of SQL Server. You can convert int , smallint , and tinyint to binary or varbinary , but if you convert the binary value back to an integer value, this value will be different from the original integer value if truncation has occurred. For example, the following SELECT statement shows that the integer value is usually stored as a binary 0xe However, the following SELECT statement shows that if the binary target is too small to hold the entire value, the leading digits are silently truncated so that the same number is stored as 0xe The following batch shows that this silent truncation can affect arithmetic operations without raising an error:.

Conversions between any data type and the binary data types are not guaranteed to be the same between versions of SQL Server.

The feedback system for this content will be changing soon. Old comments will not be carried over. If content within a comment thread is important to you, please save a copy. For more information on the upcoming change, we invite you to read our blog post. Arguments binary [ n ] Fixed-length binary data with a length of n bytes, where n is a value from 1 through 8, Remarks When n is not specified in a data definition or variable declaration statement, the default length is 1.

Data type Use when Converting binary and varbinary data When data is converted from a string data type char , varchar , nchar , nvarchar , binary , varbinary , text , ntext , or image to a binary or varbinary data type of unequal length, SQL Server pads or truncates the data on the right. Note Conversions between any data type and the binary data types are not guaranteed to be the same between versions of SQL Server. Note The feedback system for this content will be changing soon.